Failed to mount /boot

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OSentrk
Posts: 1
Joined: 2020/09/03 16:49:27

Failed to mount /boot

Post by OSentrk » 2020/09/03 16:51:51

Hello everybody,

In my server, i have Centos 7 operation system. Today I shut down and rebooted the server. But when the server is turned on, I get the following errors and not boot the /dev/sda2 disk.

They said they will open it in recovery mode and do fsck. Nothing changed despite what they did, I still get the same errors.


Image


The hosting company provides;

ArchRescue (64 bit)
Debian 9 - Live
Clonezilla Live to rescue.

What should i do to solve that issue?
I need to boot server :)

desertcat
Posts: 764
Joined: 2014/08/07 02:17:29
Location: Tucson, AZ

Re: Failed to mount /boot

Post by desertcat » 2020/09/03 19:52:06

OSentrk wrote:
2020/09/03 16:51:51
Hello everybody,

In my server, i have Centos 7 operation system. Today I shut down and rebooted the server. But when the server is turned on, I get the following errors and not boot the /dev/sda2 disk.

They said they will open it in recovery mode and do fsck. Nothing changed despite what they did, I still get the same errors.


Image


The hosting company provides;

ArchRescue (64 bit)
Debian 9 - Live
Clonezilla Live to rescue.

What should i do to solve that issue?
I need to boot server :)
WARNING: fsck works ONLY on ext2,3,or 4 partitions. It will NOT work on other types of partitions. Therefore you need to know which, if any of your partitions are ext4 (or 2or3). If you have LVM partitions consult someone who knows how to fix LVM partitions, or other types of partitions. To determine which file system type/s you have run this command:

lsblk -f

OK I'll take a stab at this. I am not sure if this is YOUR computer, or someone else's computer. If this is YOUR computer you need either a Live DVD, such as KNOPPIX -- my GoTo Utility Disk -- or another OS mounted on a separate drive.

1) Boot the alternative drive (DVD, or other Physical Drive that holds an OS).

2) Bring up a konsole (terminal)

3) Run the command su to become root

4) Run the command fdisk -l and make sure you know which drive holds your CentOS 7.8 partitions. For this example we will assume that your CentOS 7.8 partitions are on /dev/sda.

5) Run the command fsck /dev/sda1, and do the rest of them as well. If there are ERRORS present it will say "Do you want to Fix?" or something like that say Y, until that partition has been fixed, then do /dev/sda2; /sda3; etc. until the entire disk has been checked. If you have mixed File Systems, but some of them are ext4 (2 or 3), run fsck ONLY on those partitions that are ext2, 3, 4!. Determine which partition is the /boot partition, and make sure that the partition is ext4 (2 or 3).

6) Once the entire disk has been checked, shutdown KNOPPIX (or alternate drive), cross your fingers, say a prayer, and reboot the machine (the crossed finger, and prayer are optional, but won't hurt). Unless you have a DEAD drive you should have CentOS back up and running.

I am a Dinosaur: My entire system is set up with Classical Partitions, and ALL my partitions are ext4 partitions, which makes it easy to check my ENTIRE drive for errors. And YES I have had to run fsck because somehow my entire drive went out into the weeds. The ONLY drive that is NOT formatted as ext4 is a 2TB spinning rust HDD which was formatted as a SINGLE 2TB xfs partition file. You can NOT use fsck on a xfs partition.

Best Fishes,

D'Cat

desertcat
Posts: 764
Joined: 2014/08/07 02:17:29
Location: Tucson, AZ

Re: Failed to mount /boot

Post by desertcat » 2020/09/03 20:41:02

One other thing I noticed: You say "The hosting Company..." Is your system "hosted" elsewhere and you are running -- essentially -- a server that is more or less simply a terminal; OR do you have a physical machine with disk drives etc.? If you actually have a physical machine with drives etc. in your possession you might want to run the command

df

to see how much of your /boot partition has been used up. IF it is 100% full the solution is you need to axe some of your older kernels to create room in the /boot partition. Yes, the boot partition can fill up IF it is a separate partition.

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